In the Media: Hess’ multi-well pads add value in the Bakken
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In the Media: Hess’ multi-well pads add value in the Bakken

  • NorthDakota_MMorrison_0295_140521_Pumpjacks #0160_medium
07.07.2016

Multi-well pads are increasing drilling capabilities and acreage efficiency – and Hess is leading the way. Hess has the Bakken’s largest multi-well pad, with 18 wells on a single location. Inforum’s Amy Dalrymple visited Hess’ operations to get an inside look at how multi-well pads are adding value and reducing the amount of land used for drilling.

Steve McNally, general manager for Hess in North Dakota, told Inforum that multi-well pads make well development more efficient, from acquiring the land to drilling and fracking the well to monitoring wells once they're complete. "It reduces the amount of time through every single step," McNally said.

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